Cottages in Canterbury

Our range of Canterbury Cottages put you right at the heart of this historic city and its surrounding rural areas. We have self-catering holiday cottages available to rent across the Canterbury area, from the city centre to the nearby Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty that is the Elham Valley.

Canterbury is a medieval, historic city and was once home to the Romans. The city’s famously narrow streets are lined with interesting period architecture ranging from medieval, to Tudor and finally through to modern styles. The vibrancy of the city is created by its collection of shops, cafes, bars, restaurants, art galleries and museums - for an old city, Canterbury is very much alive and kicking.

If you’d prefer to rest your head in a more rural location, check out Well Cottage, Mill House Lodge and Church Cottage. All three holiday homes are located outside of the city, but within a commutable distance for you to enjoy a day, or evening out in Canterbury.

Well Cottage sleeps two guests and it is situated within the grounds of Broome Estate. The Estate is also home to a golf course, so this property is perfect for couples who are fans of the sport. Mill House Lodge and Church Cottage are both larger properties, sleeping four and seven guests respectively, so are great properties for families and larger groups. Families may also be drawn to these cottages because of their proximity to the countryside, their private gardens and spacious rooms.

For those who want to be right in the centre of the action, both Westgate Cottage and Ivy Lane are right in the heart of Canterbury.

Visiting Canterbury

Canterbury has a wealth of treasures to explore, from hidden gems to major historical landmarks. Probably best known for its Cathedral, and religious significance generally, Canterbury is a key site of English Christian history. The Cathedral itself is the city’s most popular attraction and was originally founded in 597 AD, but was modelled into the Gothic style it still resembles today in the 12th century. A visit to the Cathedral will include learning about the building’s tumultuous history, as well as taking in its gorgeous stained glass windows and dramatic ceilings.

Another major landmark in Canterbury is the remains of the city walls, originally built by the Romans. The walls themselves have been attacked countless times, first by the Normans, then by Charles II’s monarchy after the English Civil War and finally by German bombs during World War Two. Over half the circuit remains (in different stages of preservation), and is protected under law as a Grade I listed building.

A great way to take in the city is on a riverboat tour on the Stour. You can book private tours for up to six people and evening tours are available in the summer months. Canterbury is also Kent’s epicentre, meaning it has great public transport connections to the region’s coastline, including Whitstable and Herne Bay.

Canterbury also has a selection of hidden gems, including green gardens, and great independent business.



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